The Best and Worst Teaching Advice I’ve Received

Advice

Today I’m sharing some of the best and worst advice I’ve received as a teacher.  I would love to hear some of your good and bad advice in the comment section below!

The Worst (Yes, I have really been told all of the following):

  1. Keep the students quiet and you will avoid concerns from administrators. First off, I think we can all agree that constantly quiet students in neat little rows are a cultural and pedagogical thing of the past. I want my students to develop the skills to quietly read, analyze, and write about a text, but the process toward that goal mostly looks like collaboration, discussion, debate, and critical problem solving, none of which are very quiet in my experience. Second, my job is not to keep up appearances for administrators; it is to teach the students in front of me.   Great admins know what great teaching looks like; they applaud our efforts and continue to help us improve with meaningful dialogue. Mediocre or poor administrators may want to pleasantly walk down the silent halls without disruption, but that priority is not in line with my philosophy of education, so I cannot exert effort toward that goal. Luckily, in 10 years of teaching, I’ve had more positive than negative experiences with administrators once we have all gotten to know each other and value each other’s strengths.
  2. Don’t let them see you sweat. Over and over again as a 20 something new teacher, I was advised to never let students know that I didn’t know the answer, that I was new to teaching/content, or that I wasn’t sure how a lesson was going to turn out. Granted, it gets much easier to admit I don’t know everything now that I am a 30 something veteran teacher, but I my experience even at the beginning was that students know we are human and respect us much more when we admit it and move on.
  3. Don’t smile until Christmas. This age old classic piece of teacher advice needs to retire. Teaching can be stressful and overwhelming and exhausting, but it can also be so much fun! Having a sense of humor should be a credential requirement in my opinion.

The Best:

  1. Make your classroom your castle. A very wise teacher gave this advice to me right before her retirement. She told me to confidently build up the walls of my classroom castle with my best practices and my best efforts based on my particular students. She warned me to not get caught up in the drama of teachers or administrators. She said to come to collaboration as the strong, yet reasonable queen of my castle knowing that I know what is best for my people. I am open to new ideas and changing frameworks, but I should never completely throw away systems that work for my students in favor of systems that work for others.
  2. Say what you mean and mean what you say. This old adage is easier said than done. It has made me a teacher of fewer words and policies. For the most part, I’ve learned not to include idle threats or policies that I can’t enforce. I’ve also learned to craft parent emails very carefully and wait a few hours before I press send if there is any kind of negative emotion associated with it.
  3. File it appropriately (in the trash). Another wonderfully wise teacher taught me this little saying to help me stay calm when the inevitable drama of students, parents, teachers, administrators, curriculum policies, and other academic frustrations rear their ugly heads. I used to get so upset when an email would enter my inbox that included some inane complaint or senseless drama. She told me to take serious criticism seriously, but to file the rest of it in the round file (garbage). During a couple stressful school years, all she would have to do is tell me to “file it appropriately” and I would know exactly what she meant.  It was an awesome code phrase so that passing students wouldn’t pick up on the true advice to throw it away!

What are some of the best and worst pieces of advice you have received?

Activism vs. Slacktivism: A Lesson in Research and Informational Texts

Activism Lesson PlanIf you are like me, there are few things more exciting than introducing students to amazing novels and other works of fiction, but finding ways to engage students in informational texts can be a little trickier.  Today I want to share a lesson that I came upon recently that had students engaged in reading an informational text, researching credible sources, and discussing their findings.  I’ll outline the lesson below.  Please comment with questions, comments, and other informational texts that your students love!

The Lesson: 

1. Start by reading Malcolm Gladwell’s 2010 essay “Small Change: Why the Revolution Won’t be Tweeted”.  It is in my textbook and I’ve seen it popping up more and more in texts, but it is also widely available through an internet search.

2. Have students discuss the main assertion of the argument and the evidence Gladwell uses to support his thesis.  They should come to the conclusion that Gladwell’s main argument is that social media movements do not constitute real activism. I think it is also helpful to have students do a collaborative list of evidence.

3. Then the fun starts!  Start with asking students to share their preliminary ideas about whether or not social media movements are real activism.  Here are some points for discussion:

  • How can we define activism?  What are necessary elements?
  • What social media movements have you seen or participated in?  Were they real activism?
  • How have social media movements changed since 2010?

4. Challenge students to do some research about the topic. This can be an in class search if students have access or it can be homework.  Remind them about using credible sources! Here are some topics to get them started on their research, but they should be used as a jumping off point for lots of avenues for discussion:

  • Slacktivism vs. Activism
  • Social Media in the Arab Spring
  • Kony 2012
  • The ALS ice bucket challenge
  • Social Media campaigns regarding: police, sexuality, race, gender, bullying, suicide, etc.

5. After students have completed some research, structure a discussion. You could use socratic seminar, debate, or other discussion technique depending on students and time constraints.

Extension idea: After the discussion, students could formulate arguments that defend, qualify, or refute Gladwell’s assertion that social media movements are not real activism.

My students found this topic intriguing and easy to discuss in an academic setting.  I’d love to hear your questions, comments, and suggestions for other engaging informational texts in the comment section below!

8 Truthful (and Embarrassing) 4th Quarter Teacher Thoughts

I think TS Eliot and Ella Fitzgerald (among others) were speaking to teachers when they asserted that spring can really hang you up the most.  As the school year wraps up, here are eight truthful, yet embarrassing thoughts I’ve had this year and almost every 4th quarter of my career.  Can you relate?  What would you add?

1. I’d be happy to repeat my directions for the 400th time..after my coffee. I mean is it just me or do students forget how to listen at the end of the year?!?!                           Fourth Quarter Problems 1

2. These sandals have glitter, so they count as professional attire, right? This question is especially pertinent this year since I am 9 months pregnant! Haha.

Fourth Quarter Problems 7

3. Will that bell ever ring? Time flies when I am pushing my snooze button, but the middle of the school day, it feels like that clock is moving backward!

Fourth Quarter Problems 4

4. What would happen if I just gave everyone credit instead of meaningful feedback? I haven’t given in to this temptation yet, but I have come mighty close!  Here is a post with ideas for getting through the essay grading.

Fourth Quarter Problems 6

5. Spoiler Alert! By fourth quarter, my brain is so fried from simultaneously teaching multiple books to varied classes and levels that I have to make a conscious effort not to spoil novels for my students when I forget which chapter they are on.  Oops!

Fourth Quarter Problems 2

6. Do I really have to clean my room?  Organizing, cleaning, and packing at the end of the year can be cathartic, but it’s mostly just a pain in the rear.  Am I right?  Do you have to take down everything or can you leave things up during the summer?  Here’s a post about the some of the classroom decor that I have to assemble and disassemble each year.

Fourth Quarter Problems 5

7. Do I really have to justify that parent email with an answer? No, I cannot come up with a last minute extra credit assignment.  No, I will not accept late work from 4 months ago.  No, I do not hate your child.

Fourth Quarter Problems 8

8. You’re welcome! Even with all the craziness of fourth quarter, there is no career I would rather have.  Making an impact on the lives of students is the most rewarding career experience I can think of (and it doesn’t hurt when they remember to say thank you!)

fourth quarter problems 3

 

What thoughts run through your head during fourth quarter?  Share below!

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